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Best Kids Trumpet 2022: Your Kids Need THIS Trumpet!!

What are the best student trumpets? Are toddler trumpets worth it? We reveal all...

Putting a finger on the best kids trumpet is not easy; kids’ trumpets come in more than 1 form.

So aside from traditional brass trumpets aimed at students, there’s also plastic trumpets, pocket trumpets & even toy trumpets for toddlers to consider too. All of which come with their own set of quirks, features & as you can imagine, appeal to different ages. Let’s just say that your 10 year old isn’t going to be best pleased with a cheap toddler trumpet. Just as your 3 year old could likely be overwhelmed by a full-size student trumpet.

Hence why we’d encourage you to take the phrase ‘kids’ with a pinch of salt, as it’s incredibly broad + with no 2 kids being alike, to just buy an instrument based on the fact it’s ‘for kids’, is very much a shot in the dark. Or at least it was… we’ve done all we can to remedy that. Read on & we’ll not only reveal the best kids trumpets across all 4 trumpet types, but also outline what age groups they’re most suited to.

After something specific about the best kids trumpets? Or just curious what is a good starter trumpet? Use the menu below to track down all the info you need at lightspeed…

The best kids trumpets @ a glance…

12 of the best kids trumpets for sale today…

Whittling down the best trumpet for kids is quite a task, especially when these days there’s SO options!! Exactly why we’ve done all we can to simply this decision for you. Below you’ll find our top picks for 4 types of kids trumpets: brass student trumpets, toy trumpets, plastic trumpets & pocket trumpets + links to extra info, should you wish to do some background reading. Can’t say fairer than that – right?!

Without further ado then, here’s our rundown of the best kids trumpets that you can buy today…

Best brass (real) trumpets for kids… (around £100-£300)

1: Eastar Bb Trumpet for students

2: Mendini MTT-L gold brass trumpet

3: Jean Paul USA TR-330 student trumpet

Heads up: If a student brass trumpet is what you’re after, then there’s a whole lot more to consider than just these 3 picks! Want to see more? Check out our rundown of the Best Student Trumpets by smashing that neon link.

Best toy trumpets for kids… (around £10-£30)

4: Click N’ Play kids trumpet

5: CestMall Trumpet Horn for kids (with music)

6: ArtCreativity 7″ trumpets (set of 12 – ideal for parties!)

Best pTrumpet for kids… (around £80 -£150)

7: pBone Jiggs pTrumpet (multiple colours)

8: The official pTrumpet (Bright Orange)

9: Hytech Metal Polymer pTrumpet

Heads up: If a plastic trumpet is what you’re after for your child, then these 3 picks are just the tip of the iceberg. Be sure to also check out our full rundown of the Best Plastic Trumpets by smashing that neon link.

Best pocket trumpets for kids… (around £100-£250)

10: Sai Musicals pocket trumpet for kids

11: Plato gold brass pocket trumpet

12: Bright Pink pocket trumpet for kids

Heads up: If a pocket trumpet is what you’re hunting for, then there’s plenty more to choose from!! Be sure to check out our full rundown of the Best Pocket Trumpets for an even wider choice #ThankUsLater.

What is the best kids trumpet? Our editor’s choice…

Now this is a tough one.

Although straight off the bat, we would say some sort of pTrumpet is the way to go, be your child a 3/4 year old or pushing double figures. Reason being that out of all the kids trumpets for sale, plastic trumpets by far offer the best balance – especially for complete rookies.

Not only do they sound very much like their brass brothers & look pretty similar too (bar the garish colours, of course), but being plastic, they’re also incredibly: lightweight, durable & (crucially for you) budget friendly. As a starting point, they’re pretty much on the money… literally.

Plus, unlike toy trumpets, plastic trumpets (pTrumpets) don’t just appeal to young kids; people of every age play the plastic trumpet, right from 7 year old kids to 80 year old pensioners. So should your child decide that within the first puff the trumpet isn’t for them, you’ll likely be able to find someone else who’ll appreciate/ get use out of it; as an all-round purchase then, they’re pretty much perfect!

Hence why we’d say that the best kids trumpet is undoubtably the…

Latest Price!

A pTrumpet that not only sounds the part, but looks it too.

The amount of colour combinations you get with this trumpet is seriously impressive – something that’ll 100% appeal to kids. What’s more, because it comes with both 3C & 5C mouthpieces, children can also get used to the different ways of playing a trumpet + decide on what mouthpiece they prefer to play.

Something that’s useful to find out now on a cheap starter instrument, as mouthpieces for pro-grade instruments retail well into the £100s!! (gulp). And if that isn’t enough, by buying one of these trumpets you can even argue that you’re doing your bit for the environment, as the ABS used to make them is actually recycled.

Couple this with how plastic trumpets also require VERY little maintenance – no valve oil or polishing – & pretty quickly they seem like an almost perfect choice for a young child. Ask us & they really are.

So just to recap:

That’s a lairy-coloured budget-friendly trumpet that lightweight, incredibly durable & sounds (to the untrained ear) very much like a traditional brass instrument. It’s also more sustainable, FAR easier to maintain & appeals to virtually all ages.

Never mind the recipe for the best kids trumpet – this sounds more like a recipe for the best trumpet full stop. #JustSaying

Enjoy this review of the best kids trumpets, & eager for more Don’t miss out on all our Latest Musical Instrument Advice + all our recent Brass Instrument Reviews.

Or, if you’re here purely to read up on the best kids trumpets, then keep reading & we’ll answer even more of your burning questions + discuss why getting your child a trumpet is such a good idea…

The lowdown on kids trumpets, when they should learn trumpet & more…

Of course a 5 year old can play a trumpet, however…

This does depend on what trumpet you get. Buy a student brass trumpet & chances are it’ll be too heavy for your little to hold straight. The valves also may not be that kind on their small fingers – compared to other types of trumpets, brass trumpets tend to have slightly stiffer valves.

And while you could buy them a toy trumpet, we’d be tempted to throw them in at the deep end & get the a plastic trumpet. A instrument that in essence, is much the same as a classical trumpet, apart from the fact it’s lighter, cheaper & being ABS, is pretty much indestructible.

The only thing you may have to consider (especially if you live in flats) is buying a trumpet mute. That way your 5 year old can play til their heart’s content without robbing you of your hearing or annoying your neighbours.

Erm – it’s quite hard to put a number on that.

See, no two kids are the same, so what age is appropriate for them to learn the trumpet can differ quite a bit. Ask us though & we’d say 3 years old or more is a good guideline.

However, one thing we would remind you to be careful of is the weight of the trumpet, as giving a 3 year old a heavy brass trumpet could potentially harm their muscles or see them trap their little fingers!

If you’re not entirely sure about what sort of kids trumpet to buy, then we’d say a toy trumpet would be good place to start (i.e. play it safe). And once your little one’s got the hang of that, then consider upgrading them to a plastic trumpet or perhaps a lightweight pocket.

The toy trumpet… derrrrr. All you do is press a button.

But seriously, toy trumpets aside, the easiest one for a child to play acoustically would likely be a plastic trumpet. Reason being that aside from being lighter & having valves that are slightly less stiff, plastic trumpets tend to also require less puff than a brass instrument to make a sound.

What’s more, plastic trumpets are virtually maintenance free – they don’t require valve oil or polish. Just a simple wipe over with a cloth + a bathe/ soak every 6 months or so, depending on how often the trumpet is played.

An easy way to avoid having to clean a trumpet regularly would be to invest in a trumpet case or gig bag. An accessory that some of the trumpets above do already come with may we add.

When choosing a toddler trumpet, there’s a few things we’d say you’d be wise to look for, including…

Size – The last thing a toddler wants is a trumpet that’s clunky & hard to handle. So be sure to pay close attention to the size of a pocket trumpet & make sure that it’s kind to little fingers. Otherwise trumpets are not going to = fun.

Weight – For toddlers, this is a HUGE one!! There’s little point in a pocket trumpet if your child is unable to pick it up. Hence why opting for something lightweight would be a wise move, especially if you want your child to be able to take it with them ‘on the go’ or play their own mini (slightly squeaky) concerto. But eh – greatness has to start somewhere, right?

Playful colours – Put an instrument in-front of a child & you want it to be inspiring, not dull. Exactly why we’d say any trumpet for a toddler should at least have a splash of colour. That way they’ll hopefully be more intrigued & eager to play it. Something that could mean they pick it up a lot faster.

Kiddie quirks – Aside from it being a trumpet, there’s a lot to be said about childish quirks when buying for a toddler. Get a trumpet that plays music as well as lets them play, & you’re opening up a whole new level of interaction. Who knows – these sounds could be the start of awakening their musical ear.

If your child is yet to hit double figures, then yes – you should certainly bother with other types of trumpets. Perhaps not a toy trumpet, but a plastic one would be a solid choice.

If your child is a beginner, they’re ideal. Lightweight, durable & most importantly, cheaper for you to buy! Plus, not kid wants the excessive cleaning routine that you get with a brass trumpet – i.e. frantic polishing & maintenance. Heck, some brass trumpets even have to be treated to a special type of chemical cleaning once in a while. And yep – that’s as expensive as it sounds.

Really then, a brass trumpet is only for serious beginners, who want to develop their skills as a trumpeter to a professional level. For casual play, there’s really no need.

The trumpets you find in schools can vary quite a bit.

That’s because a LOT of instrument manufacturers donate trumpets to schools or offer discounts to encourage kids to get into music. The pBone plastic trumpet is likely something you’d find in a pre school, whereas brass trumpets like the ones above are more like those you’d find at junior/ secondary schools.

In the case a student takes music seriously out of the classroom however, you’re more likely to find them playing on something slightly more professional. A Yamaha YTR-2330 or the Hawk WD-T313 for instance.

While there is no stopping you from letting your child start their musical career on a brass instrument, we’d recommend saving the pennies & opting for a plastic instrument.

We say so because aside from being a decent chunk cheaper than brass alternatives, plastic instruments are also more durable & require less maintenance. Brass requires frequent polishing & even cleaning can get complex. Whereas plastic instruments are super simple to care for. Simple wipe them down with a towel.

What’s more, being plastic, they’re a LOT lighter meaning your child can pursue their musical passions ‘on the go’. And not only that, but they don’t strain their little muscles in the process – brass instruments can get heavy!

Indeed they are.

In fact, between the ages of 2 & 7, youngsters learn at more or less double the rate of adults!! So to give them a kids trumpet (especially at such an age) is a great way to encourage their creative thinking. So if you’re looking for an easy way to get your child thinking about music, then there’s few better things that junior instrument.

Apart from being interactive & enhancing your child’s hand-eye coordination, kids trumpets are (crucially) a way of learning that’s NOT on a screen. A rarity these days, especially when iPads & computers are now being taught to kids from an early age.